Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Modern Conundrum

'Fabrics are from Woodland Friends by Ellen Crimi-Trent'
"Truly modern things are progressive and forward thinking in their performance and in how they're made." David Keeps, LA Times

I woke up in the middle of the night last night, thinking about quilts and the modern quilting movement. I'm even quilting in my dreams these days.

I'm not sure it's a movement, a trend, maybe? But is it really modern? Are modern fabrics or a twist on the traditional enough to make a quilt modern? Are there even modern quilts at all, or are they simply quilts made today. I can't remember where I read a comment from a quilter that she felt like 'modern' is simply a buzz word and that the vast majority of quilts she's been seeing that are characterized as modern, really aren't. They're traditional, but it's not "cool" to be traditional these days. Interesting perspective.

I find Mr. Keeps' quote thought provoking. I believe we will all come to terms in our own minds about what makes a quilt 'modern, but for me, the idea of modern conjures images of modern design, mid-century modern, and modern art. Modern makes something feel, 'out there' and edgy. I like that feeling.

Someone once described my quilting style as modern/vintage. I'm thinking I want to leave the vintage behind and push myself further out of my comfort zone. Tradition is a powerful force, though.

Do you all think about these things?


50 comments:

Bellgirl said...

Actually I have just been pondering over these very things. I've joined my first online bee, a 'modern' bee, and am wondering how to choose a design that really fit into that concept or aesthetic.

So far the quilts I've made have been very simple, and I think that they probably have a 'modern' look only because they use large scale prints and large blocks.

I like the improvised style I see in lots of modern quilts, although improvisation is not in itself 'modern'. However improvisation for artistic reasons rather than necessity might be modern.

So what makes a quilt "modern' rather than just 'current', the way we do things now? I'll look forward to hearing more thoughts, it might help me choose a direction for my bee quilt!

Alissa said...

I think about this all day, every single day. I am consciously pushing myself to constantly grow and make more and more modern quilts. We're on exactly the same wavelength here...

Marianne said...

Hello,
I live in Switzerland and I look at your blog while following the pool of fresh modern quilts. I make quilts and I watched a few points which describes the movement modern quilts. The first is often very clear tissue nay white are put into the quilt. The second lot of quilts are just a few blocks and do not satisfy the entire quilt. The third is that a great spirit of simplification through these quilts, the circles or curves are not applied and sewn. The fourth thing quilts are often. quilted by machine with very simple lines. These quilts are the perfect representation of women in our time, we need to do it fairly quickly because often they work, they must be practical and easily integrate the new standard of decor with clean lines. I really like this trend and I am especially pleased that young women begin to make quilts that is most important. Excuse my American because I use a panel for writing translation

Agnes said...

As a new quilter and very much aligned with the "modern" aesthetic (so take my opinion with a large grain of salt!), trends and current 'modes' are pretty cyclical. I think many blocks are traditional even the simple geometric ones that are reminiscent of the Gee's Bend quilters. The big difference is the colours, colour combinations, large scale patterns that are available now. Also I guess it depends on what 'modern' means and whether there is an accepted definition of what makes modern quilting, well, 'modern'! Whatever it is though, I like it.

Emma said...

I think you're right - modern quilts aren't exactly modern. Oh, we change up a few things - instead of traditional log cabins we have wonky log cabins, but that's not all that big of a change. I always laugh at flickr because I add my quilts to the "Fresh Modern Quilts" pool. They have to be approved by someone to show up, and I haven't added a quilt yet that wasn't approved. But all of those quilts were traditional designs done in bright colors - trip around the world, disappearing 9 patch, pinwheels, etc. Nothing new there!

What Comes Next? said...

I think about this, too. To me, every era is it's own modern. The use of solids isn't new - think Amish quilts - very striking, often simple patterns. Quilters have been "twisting" traditional since they started sewing - someone always wants to make it their own, and not follow a pattern exactly. This is where new quilt designs come from! The use of very large scale prints I think is very "today". I had to laugh at Emma's comment about the "Fresh Modern Quilts" Flickr pool - I've had more quilts "rejected" then accepted - maybe because I like to use batiks? hmmmm...

nicolette said...

Interesting thoughts Jacquie!

What makes quilts modern... phew..
I’m sure modern prints add to the modern factor of a quilt, but often the blocks that are used are traditional.
I like to think of myself as a contemporary quilter, mostly using modern fabrics to make quilts with more or less traditional patterns, and sometimes pushing myself to quilt outside the box, but somehow it (still) doesn’t fit me.
At the same time my love for traditional quilts from reproduction and Japanese printed fabrics is growing. I also love to read about the quilts made by our ancestors and to look at those handquilted stitches. I love to explore that path as well and I love to learn new to me techniques.

I often regret to see quilts on blogs and flickr pages that are put together so poorly and in sake of the wonkyness are called modern.
Most important is to communicate our quilting love and skills to the next generation. It’s wonderful to see so many young quilters on the internet!

Jacqui said...

I can see why people would claim that 'modern quilts' are just old-fashioned ones under a new name, but I don't think they are - any more than today's fashion revival of the 80s is an exact retread of the original 80s. Which were an interpretation of the 40s to a degree. I saw a woman wearing actual vintage 80s gear the other day and she looked like it too, you could tell it wasn't new. There are always subtle differences that reflect the context the style has developed within. So yes there are common ideas of simplicity and so-on, but they don't come from the same source and they don't look quite the same as a result.

I think it also has a lot to do with the current crop of fabrics. The same pattern made up in fussy taupe florals will be quite different rendered in Echino or Modern Love. And in 10 years they will probably look terribly old-fashioned before coming back into vogue in 30 years when they will be vintage and copied - but the fabrics won't be 2010 they'll be 2010 filtered through 30 years of cultural change and innovation until they're 2040.

I know what you mean about leaving the 'vintage' behind, but I think considering it as simply the same old thing as has always been done is doing it a bit of a disservice.

Esch House Quilts said...

I do think about these things, but not as much as I should or I'd like to - too much other clutter in my head!

But, to me, use of "modern" fabrics alone does not make a quilt modern. I think the layout of the quilt is also very important. The modern quilts I like best break away from the blocks in rows look. Sometimes they may actually be constructed this way, but that isn't obvious at first glance.

True Blue Nana said...

So interesting that I read your comments first thing this morning. I must have laid in bed over an hour this morning picturing quilts in my mind. I was thinking about colors, shapes, and figuring out what measurements would work. Even though I was a math teacher I usually don't think about measurements.

When I tell people I am a quilter often they say, oh or ugh!. I know they are thinking of hundreds of little squares put together the very same way, talk about boring. I prefer contemporary to modern. I explain that I try to put a contemporary look to traditional patterns. Maybe modern works better, who knows!

Beth said...

Your getting some interesting comments...

As a big fan of the midcentury design movement, I also think about things with a retro 50s and 60s feel and the kitsch rocket age or tiki vibe movements running strongly through them. This is definitely MCM but not definitely modern. At the time they were first produced I'm sure the Eames Lounger or Rocker were thought edgy and "out there" but now not so much, so maybe it's that we look at things through a lens of sophistication now!

Miss White Wall said...

Modern by definition is "of, relating to, or characteristic of the present or the immediate past."

My thought process goes to say, so what if modern is becoming today's traditional. Isn't that inevitable, isn't that desired, expected, welcomed?

By saying you're a modern quilter, or a you created a modern quilt, aren't you just differentiating from the old traditional? The dark batiks, the bland prints, the old clothes? The fabrics and styles that were once used to create the quilts of yesterday?

Sometimes I think we get sidetracked into thinking that most quilters today are "modern". I beg to differ, most quilters I know create traditional quilts. However it is true that most BLOGGERS I know focus on the modern prints and patterns. Sometimes I think we forget we're not the only individuals quilting.

I believe we move from modern to traditional when there is a significant period of time when one type of quilting has reigned and a shift creates a new fashion in the quilting world.

So for now I'm quite comfortable calling myself a "modern" quilter and the lady next door who quilts by hand batik dark fabrics the traditional way, a "traditional" quilter. And until my type of quilting becomes the norm, until a tradition emerges, I think I have just cause for doing so.

Great topic! I love when people ask such interesting questions...

Martys Fiber Musings said...

Yes, Yes, I'm loving going more modern - yes - and abstract - quilts that aren't centered - quilts using fabrics that don't blend, yet have the same 'depth of field' - quilts that are coming out of my head rather than off the page of a magazine!

I'll continue to make traditional 'cause I still have lots of fabric, but my newer purchases are entirely different from even one year or five years ago. It just feels good.....

Glad you asked - it was good to admit out loud that I'm changing. My quilting group is still very, very traditional so my work is (sadly) not looked on here with much favor.

Barb said...

I do think about the direction of my future quilting and quilts. I love the fresh look of the modern quilts, but my heart sings when it sees good folk art pieces...Love the quote.

The Calico Cat said...

I am regularly thinking about this - reevaluating the quilt kits that I made for myself in the past - reevaluating my fabric choices - donating those that don't fit any longer (I know bad idea, but my toddler is going to need my fabric closet sooner rather than later so everything is moving onto a baker's rack.)

I think that "moderne" is an open definition that is more inclusive than exclusive. When I started to quilt in 2000, you had to be vetted into a guild...

Also I think that wonky does not equal poor quality/poor construction, you can be wonky with 1/4 inch seams...

The funniest thing, my GF (Who has been quilting since before the 76 revival) considers my style/likes to be 50's!

natalie. beyond the reef said...

Modern has been a topic of discussion since, oh, well, you know, before the ages. Modern as in impressionists to the painters before them? Modern as in mid-century-modern (the 50's)? Modern as in the 1970's orange and avocado? Modern as in folk art?
"Whose modern is it, anyway?" is what I say....
Enjoy what you do, and spend more time doing it...be well educated about it, then get back to it!
be.do.create

Kate said...

I tend to think most of us use modern when perhaps contemporary would be a better word choice, at least as far as design aesthetic goes. I have seen scrap quilts from the 1850s that look a lot like what some of us ate creating, but with a different color palette. I think this discussion is somewhat related to the idea of adjusting an older pattern and claiming it is new and unique and being frustrated when others do the same. Although some, such as Elizabeth H's "new wave" pattern certainly seem to qualify as new and unique.

Almakatsu@gmail.com said...

What's that collection featured in the photo? THANK YOU

Lisa said...

I think modern is more flexible... it is doing traditional in new ways, using more colorful and unexpected fabrics, breaking some rules, putting new twists on others. I think even traditional quilt blocks appear modern with the right fabric choices.

Duff said...

I see many traditional blocks with contemporary fabric labeled "modern," but to me, modern is something more artistic. It's a creative process that you start, but in the end it leads you. Like a calling. So far, I've been a complete and utter chicken liver, but the designs come to me in my sleep or from elements I see (architecture, gardens, etc.). Some day soon I'm going to start and see where IT decides to end up.

live a colorful life said...

I think about quilting, modern or otherwise, all day long and wake up at night thinking about it. These comments are fascinating, especially Jacqui above. Although right before this I read a blog about simplifying and turning off technology for a whole day, uh, today is NOT going to be that day and I'm checking back all day to read the latest comments on this post.

Megan said...

Such an interesting discussion! I get caught up a lot in modern vs. contemporary and I'm still not so sure where I really land. Heck, I still struggle with calling myself a quilter at all. What I'm enjoying most about the "modern" quilting movement/trend is all of the wonderfully talented, generous and creative people I'm meeting (both online and at my local MQG). And whether the quilts they make are labelled modern, traditional, or anything in between I am thrilled that there is a gathering of like-minded people who are open to each individual's sense of style and interpretation. Personally, I want to push myself to create things that are a reflection of me. They may look modern and/or more traditional and I don't want to feel limited by any label. I am a quilter. And for me, that is enough.

Thanks for the wonderful thought-provoking post!

Sequana said...

I hesitate to say this, but I rarely think about his at all. *S*

I just keep moving along, buying what fabric I like, making what quilts I love; if, in the process, I'm making "modern" or contemporary quilts, it's all good.

Andie said...

We have this discussion all the time in our Cincinnati Modern Quilt Guild. Art is subjective. And defining this movement or mindset or trend - whatever one wants to call it - may be a subjective thing.

Great post, Jacqui - something all of us modernites think about but can't really define.

Mitzi said...

Just this morning I was wondering what kind of quilter I will call myself in 25 years. What kind of fabrics will there be? What will the younger generations be into? Will I be considered a fuddy-duddy then?

Pam said...

Modern quilting has found it's way to the younger with new designers creating wonderful new fabric and the blog world exploding with inspiration.The average age for quilters is no longer 52...which is btw how old I am. I have been in LOVE with quilting for 20 years. Modern is new and fresh and has opened up a bunch of new doors. I love it and I also love the tradition it came from.

momto2wasd said...

The more I see photos of some quilts that are from the 1800s and other times, the more I'm thinking there's nothing too different about the designs. I believe the difference is mostly in the fabrics that give it a more "modern" look. A friend of my mom only uses calicos, & her quilts don't fit the "modern" look. But her fabrics are still newly purchased, so the fabric isn't the only thing. It's hard to define. In the end, I don't think it matters. It's all good.

Now art quilts...those seem more truly modern in that they are further from the traditional quilt.

Natalie said...

wow...you've gotten a lot of comments on this topic! My 2cents:

How does the saying go? 'Everything that was once old becomes new again'. With an art form as long lasting as quilting, there are bound to be similarities between old and new. While it may be hard to define what 'modern' quilting is right now and how it is different from 'traditional', I think there is a difference.

One notable difference is that feeling of connection. Like how you feel when you've stepped into a shop that carries 'your' fabric (or how it feels to step into one that doesn't). You know what a joy it is to talk to someone who is interested in what your working on and thinks your pattern and fabric selection is spot on (or what it's like to talk to someone who doesn't understand why your sashing is solid white and doesn't have a clue who is).

Another difference is that modern quilters don't seem to be as bogged down with rules or formulas like: a balanced quilt must have an assortment of light, medium, and dark fabrics. I've seen so many beautiful quilts that don't follow that rule! Or: when quilting, never cross your stitch lines. Try telling that to Leah Day! Another rule: use tone-on-tones instead of solids when a solid color is necessary for a pattern. I am pretty sure all of us can agree that we love solids!

I think technology also plays a key role in 'modern'. A lot of modern quilters shop online rather than brick and mortar stores. Many modern quilters follow blogs or write their own. Modern quilters use social networks like Flickr as a means to connect and exchange/swap.

I don't want to stand on this particular soap box too long but I've had some bad experiences when interacting with 'traditional' quilters and quilt shops. It reminds me of how movies portray the rich and nouveau riche (I'm neither so I don't know if this actually happens in real life). I've experienced it all: snobbery, un-helpfulness, rudeness, feeling judged, ageism (I'm 27 and look even younger), skepticism, lack-of interest/enthusiasm, not acknowledging me at all...etc. Clearly they thought they were different enough from me to treat me that way. I have decided to not shop at my local quilt shop and instead drive 20 minutes further to the quilt shop that has my fabrics and is nice to me.

I think this modern movement will be good for quilting in general. It's an art that should not be lost in the shuffle and forgotten.

Jolene said...

There is nothing new under the sun... That doesn't say that we can't keep pushing our personal comfort zone and learning new things, but to me the feeling that 'I've labeled myself as a modern quilter, now I've got to stay on the cutting edge' is not a good feeling. I want to make what I love, what inspires me. And I don't want anyone turning up their nose at me and saying, "that's so yesterday" (even if it is!) I don't want to give that impression to others either, because each person's creation is worth something, whether it falls within my personal tastes or not.

A person's reaction to this discussion depends so much on whether you have an analytical type of personality. I don't, so I tend to say, "Who cares?". On the other hand, I totally respect you folks who feel the need to categorize, and find the real meaning of words.

If this doesn't make sense, just disregard it!

Poppyprint said...

Like everyone it seems, yes, I think about it all the time! There are several blog threads where people are considering the 'modern' quilt movement and what it means. I have a deep respect for the tradition of quilt making, even the 'rules' of it actually, but I am enjoying the exploration of line, shape and colour more than pattern these days. That for me, is modern....a movement away from the obvious pattern. I still love a beautiful folk-art piece, or traditional blocks made with funky mod fabric. It's all good and I am making an effort not to get hung up on a definition or categorization of quilts. I know what I like to do - I'll never make a Baltimore Album, for instance - but I love and appreciate beauty in excellent work, no matter what the pattern or design. The resurgence of quilting as a craft and art (and business for some) is good for all of us and I couldn't be happier!

KateKwiltz said...

Yes, but not in the middle of the night. :)

Nikki said...

For me, I think beginning quilting with traditional methods/patterns/fabrics was really beneficial.

Quilts are all about comfort to me. Traditions and traditional quilting provide instant comfort in my book.

I try to keep my traditional roots and put a modern spin to them.

Cheryl Arkison said...

I've actually been thinking lately that so much of what is called modern quilting is actually quite lazy. Giant squares, so much negative space (too lazy to piece more blocks?), useless sized quilts, charm packs, and quilting that isn't very creative.

But Marianne, earlier in the comments here, made a very good point about quilts being a reflection of our times. And we current quilters face two things. One, we are generally busy women with families and jobs. So we seek out the simple and want more quilts rather than one per year. And two, the internet pushes us to share and post as much as possible. Churn instead of quality.

What is generally seen as modern quilting is different from what was seen even as recently as 5 years ago. While I've always been a bit uncomfortable with the notion of a movement (this isn't suffrage folks), I do see a change in quilting.

Interestingly, I think the industry as a whole is part of the reason. It isn't just that there are pretty fabrics, it's that they are designed to be shown off. No longer is a line made up of 1-2 large prints, 1-2 small prints, a dot, and a stripe anymore. So they need patterns to showcase these fabrics. And patterns are evolving to do just that, rather than showcase design.

Oh you know me, we could talk about this forever!

Vicki said...

I agree with what Cheryl said about laziness, at least in some of the quilts I've seen on blogs over the last couple years.

I don't know what modern really means, and the work I do probably isn't really "modern" either, but I make what I like and I try to do my best. :)

Christina said...

I'm one of those people that loves "traditional" quilts shown in a new way - and often, I too see it termed as "modern" because of the fabrics chosen, or maybe the layout of the traditional blocks. But I kind of laugh to myself and think "everything old is new again". BUT there definitely is a "modern" movement, though maybe more of a "contemporary" movement is the way to phrase it...? If ever there was a modern quilter, in my mind, you fit that bill! And what's wrong with being modern-vintage? :)

Victoria said...

Love the quote, and if it is to be a truthful one then wouldn't that mean that "Modern" must be something that is ever evolving and changing? And thus, what begins as modern, possible has the potential to soon becomes cliche?

While you Jacquie, have always impressed me as a forward thinking artist/quilter, and one who keeps pushing the boundaries, (thus someone I respect and have great admiration for) I have overall become a bit disillusioned by the Modern Quilting movement. From what I see, people are already falling into the same old same old. Too many works are looking alike, and it is often hard for me to tell one quilters work from another. I think that instead of questioning, stretching and pushing the envelope, (as I think modern artists from the past did) too many of today's "modern" quilters just fall back on white, wonky, solid... she did it, so I'll do it too... ZZZzzzz! It makes me want to scream, "For Pete's sake, dig deeper, and bring something new to the table!"

Is this a movement just because a lot of people have signed up and it's popular, (making it nothing more then the flavor of the day) or is this a real artistic movement because new concepts and ways of thinking are evolving? (I wish it were the latter, but fear it is the former.)

Anonymous said...

Some people would like to think their quilts are modern, but there is nothing modern about patchwork. There are modern fabrics, with modern designs perhaps , there is a lot of art quilting called modern, but in the end it is still the same , a fabric sandwich held together with thread. The most modern Ive seen is a plain fabric quilt already done by the French a long time ago, and a crazy type quilt done by the Victorians.Perhaps 3d or quilts with dimention and a flower half sticking out of the quilt is about as modern as it gets, OH yeah I did see a pc board quilt, a quilt look like the inside of a pc board with wires and all..I get a little upset when young women talk of inventing quilt as u go anf other tecqnuqies that I saw back in the late 70s and early 80s being used by people like Georgia Bonesteel and not giving those ladies the credit.

2ndAvenueStudio-Rachel said...

I think about this alot ... what makes it modern?
I tend to think of the "modern" as in "modern art". And thats it about the
...fabric not the piecing..
.the using not the hanging/showing...
... the speed of making not the precision..

I was going to a traditional guild with lots of elderly ladies and lots of civil war repros and lots of bedazzled 3-d flowers.
Going to a modern guild is a game changer. There I am one of the old ladies in the room and the work is soo much more interesting to me, I'm accepted and finding ladies that regardless of age have a similar perspective, In a sense I have found my peeps...
so whatever you call it... Im in..
excuse me now, I need to go work on my cross quilt before the craze passes... :D

MightyMom said...

do not deny your tradition.

for you must have roots in the past before you can spread your wings into the future.

Rachel Hauser said...

This is a fascinating discussion. I love that people are putting it all out on the table. I will say that I don't know if others consider my work modern or not - but that's beside the point. I'm just making what I like. And, btw, it does often include large blocks, but that's not being lazy. I like the way my quilts look with less piecing and I enjoy the process more with less piecing. Lazy only applies if you'd wish for more.

CathyAgent said...

From the Random House Dictionary:

MODERN: of, pertaining to, or characteristic of contemporary styles of art, literature, music, etc., that reject traditionally accepted or sanctioned forms and emphasize individual experimentation and sensibility.

CONTEMPORARY: of the present time; modern


Either term works but I like Modern more because the things I see that are compelling are the ones that do emphasize individual experimentation while being of the present time.

Or maybe it is like pornography -- you know it when you see it.

At any rate it is oh so much more fun to walk into a fabric/quilting store selling current fabrics (e.g. Cool Cottons or Bolt here in Portland) than some stuffy old quilt shop filled with calicos. Just my opinion. :-)

Anita said...

Regardless of what anyone want's to call it, I love that more people are appreciating sewing in it's many forms. It's cool again to know how to use a sewing machine. :)

sara said...

sometimes i think of 'modern' as 'simple'. i feel a modern styled house is simplistic with clean lines and sparse furnishings. sometimes i compare 'modern'quilts with that style - simple to the eye (whether it is simple construction is another issue!) a quilt with all solid fabrics or a unique design. when i think of traditional i think of following a pattern and lots of measuring and triangles.

I also read somewhere where someone who might be classified as a 'traditionalist' doesn't think of 'modern' quilters as legit bc often times we don't measure or follow directions and that is what depicts a quilter. I think a quilter is someone with a love for sewing, fabric and creating. I think what we 'classify' ourselves is which design style or art we lean towards - just the same as we all decorate our houses differently with many styles.

Lindy said...

I don't care what you call the new style quilts. The fabrics look just like the prints my mother used for her cotton dresses and aprons in the 50's and 60's. While it is a great thing that younger women are trying out quilting, their products will not stand the test of time if they are shoddily made. Even Picasso learned a more classic style of painting before he became a "modern" artist. One needs to know the rules before changing them.

Kelley said...

This is an interesting conversation. I tend to think the "modern" label is a method of adding a comfort level to those who don't want to be considered stereotypical granny quilters. The fact remains that it is still patchwork, it is still quilted, it still has three layers - so it is a quilt. Call it whatever you want as long as you enjoy making them!

Sherry said...

I noticed that before this
'modern' movement there were lots of what I call quickie quilts. Those that have large pieces and can be sewn together very quickly. Some with good results and some not so good. I think the 'modern' quilts have taken this idea up a step making the result crisper and more controled. Using solids and less geometric layouts add to the 'modern' feel. And making sure the piecing and quilting were done well, is another way to recognize 'modern' quilts.
Today's quilter has great tools, and great fabric. The resulting quilts are wonderful.
I started quilting in 1975, when things were 'mod'. I was young and not many were into quilting at the time. The first class I took was at a senior center. I was the youngest, but not many were seniors.
I love the 'modern' quilts and have as much fun making them as I have had making 'traditional' or 'vintage' quilts. It's been fun to watch quilting evolve through the years. I can't wait to see what comes next!

The Tulip Patch said...

I love this discussion!

I know I am not modern, but I feel like I'm floating somewhere in the middle unclaimed. I just make what I like, and that involves a lot of American Jane!

I am more worried with how that quilt makes me FEEL that if it makes others THINK.

I don't love super fussy traditional or what Cheryl was calling "lazy" (love that candor!).

angie said...

Even though I am late to sewing and quilting (started in May)...both of my grandmother's and my Mom, Aunts, etc sewed, quilted, canned, gardened, knitted, crocheted, etc....I think a lot of what makes a quilt modern these days is how it is made....machine piecing and quilting? My grandmother's would have thought that was crazy. I can guarantee they were not buying fabric at
$9.00 dollars a yard and would FAINT if they knew I was. They made quilts with what they had...we make quilts with what we like and what we want. Quilts were made to be used in the winter when it was cold! We make quilts to fill a desire to create. And if you don't think there is a difference between a "traditional" quilter and a "modern" quilter, then take a class from a VERY traditional quilter....
There are a lot of rules in traditional quilting....the modern quilters like to bend them! I am certainly in the modern camp.

angie said...

Oops, for some reason my I.D. was not working in above post!

sheree of sheree's alchemy said...

Hey Jacquie,
I checked in to see what you have been up to, as I have not had time to blog hop in a while..and wow, you have alot of posts I want to comment on. This one first. I try not to even define my style, what I do. I think it is all so subjective. I do what I love and work with fabrics that I love and end up (ususally) with creations that I love. I love modern, I love vintage, I love retro. Vintage and retro are easier to define. Modern changes year to year, because the old comes back in style and becomes modern, but it was vintage...so you just go in circles on it. So I don't even really think about it much anymore.

Just know that we all think your "style" is lovely!
Sheree