Friday, March 1, 2013

Bang You're Dead at QuiltCon

I was proud to have several quilts hanging in the QuiltCon show.  As a Board member, I couldn't be a part of the judged show, but I was able to hang quilts for exhibit only.  Of all my quilts in the show, I was proudest of this one.  Many folks have emailed and wanted to see the finished quilt, the quilting, the back, the binding, so here is the finished quilt hanging at QuiltCon.

The quilt is quilted with horizontal straight lines 1/4" apart and let me tell you they are straight and perfectly horizontal.  The thread changes with each of the three colors on the quilt top.  I again partnered with Anne Christopher for the quilting on this quilt.  It was totally out of Anne's comfort zone and I think she actually developed a new skill set having worked on this quilt.  She, like me, is a total perfectionist and it shows.
 The quilting is meant to add to the stark, emotionless, empty feel of the background which creates even more impact for the subject of the quilt.
 The back is very simple, with white fabric on the top, black on the bottom with a simple strip of faces dividing the back of the quilt.  This is an Alexander Henry print which was one of the very first modern quilting fabrics that I purchased.  It's called "In Crowd."  For me, the back is more haunting than the front.
The binding is a light blue shot cotton.  The blue is my small nod to the city of Chicago.  This blue is one of the colors in the Chicago flag.

I sold the quilt at QuiltCon.  I wasn't planning to, it just happened.  While I am proud to have made this quilt and it was a cathartic experience making it, I am done with this quilt.  I am committed to the cause of anti-violence and I don't need the quilt to remind me of my commitment.  This quilt has found a home with a leader in the quilting community who has made a promise to me to see that the quilt will make a difference.  I am proud that she owns this quilt.

28 comments:

Charlotte said...

I was glad to see this quilt in person - it has even more impact in real life. Congratulations on the sale.

Laikabear said...

Thank you for sharing this quilt. My first reaction was "I don't like it" when I saw the previous post. (Although I appreciate it). Now, I find I like it more having seen the closeup of the quilting and the back. I really like the back. :) I'm new to your blog after seeing your QuiltCon lecture on Craftsy and I really love your work. I've only been quilting for a few months but what you've accomplished in 5 years gives me a lot of hope for the future! :)

Paula said...

This quilt is very impressive and impactful. Hope it does help bring the issue to light and help make a difference in this violent world we live in. Great quilt my friend.

patricia gooden said...

I was very moved by this quilt when I saw it on your original post and I was very honored to have seen it hanging at QuiltCon. Bravo!

Alexis said...

This quilt is so moving. It reminds me a little bit of Katherine Clark's "foreclosure" quilts in addressing an issue of social justice in a way that makes a deep emotional impact.

Jenny Squawk said...

The quilt was visually striking with an immediate gut wrench. I am happy that it will continue to show and will be used to strike others for good.

Jenny M said...

I'm so impressed by this quilt, as I've said before. But this time a comment on presentation -- even though it's out of your hands now. Is there a way to add corner weights or some sort of stiffener for the bottom, if it's displayed again? I find the slight curl at the bottom distracting, my eye is trying to figure out if it's square (which I'm sure it is, knowing you), or if there are shadows. I'm sure a hanging rod sleeve and light dowel would do the trick, but small pockets sewn on with fishing weights, or some other such thing might, as well. Or maybe the curl will fall out with storage. (Or maybe you're not bothered by it.) Anyhow, just a thought. Great work, and congratulations on selling it and being able to move on! I can imagine that it would be weird to have in the house -- somehow disrespectful to shove in a closet, but not what you need in full view. Sounds like a great outcome.

jacquie said...

good idea, jenny. it is square. it's the dense quilting that makes it curl like that. I was constantly going over to it and curling it back. when i blocked it it hung totally straight...maybe that's because it was against a wall...don't know. love your idea though. might help.

felicity said...

I was struck by this quilt when you blogged it, and I felt very honoured to see it in person. It's powerful and provocative and controversial. I absolutely love your work, Jacquie.

Patti said...

Tremendous quilt. Powerful, thought-provoking. I'm glad it has a good home. And I do hope it makes a difference in the world.

Megan said...

This quilt is such a dramatic piece of art - I'm glad it's finding its way to a home that will, as Jenny above said, "strike others for good." I got to hear a bit of its backstory when you spoke in Chapel Hill last fall, and the starkness of the quilt so vividly captures the senseless emptiness that violence leaves in its wake.

emedoodle said...

Thanks for making a quilt that makes us think so much. It was nice to see / feel the emotion of this quilt in person. Congrats on the sale too. I hope this quilt continues to do great things.

SusieDW said...

More striking than ever. It's odd to think that it is a compliment to mention that I felt sick when I looked at this great piece of art. I keep thinking of "Flat Line", as in DEAD, when taking in the beautiful quilting you and Anne accomplished. This is one time when I wish I could see the front and back at the same time. I'm thankful you were able to show (and sell) it. I believe your statement was heard and you spoke for many people. (NOTE: re the presentation Jenny spoke of. I used to use a string of lead beads to weight needlepoint wallhangings. I suppose you could us bullets
).

CitricSugar said...

I'm really happy that this piece will become a tool in the cause.

Looking at it now, I think there's a pixelated video-game effect that has such a poignance… Still shaken by it, still thankful for it.

Molly said...

This quilt really moves me too. It is quilts like this that really push the artist envelope in quilting. Anything that can strike such a chord, and make you think so much- well it isn't a craft... it is fine art. I am very happy you found the right home for it and I hope many others get to see it. Glad you had a blast at quiltcon, wish I could have been there!

Kate said...

I'm not surprised you are proud of this quilt - it is chilling and confronting. Amazing.

Anonymous said...

I don't like this and I will no longer follow your blog.

QuiltSwissy said...

Congratulations on the sale, I guess you are now a millionaire! I do love this quilt. I showed this to a friend of mine, who paints these really graphic drug addict faces. He was taken by your statement and your quilt. He has a similar mission with his very unique paintings.

glen

Leanne said...

Seeing this quilt in person was a wonderful experience. It is moving and powerful, and conveys to me the message you were hoping for. Thank you for sharing more about it here.

kitty said...

This is such an impressive quilt!! It's a very powerful statement given in a most artistic way. It may not be here in my house, but I'll have it in my mind for ever!

Julie Nolte Owen said...

I just watched your QuiltCon talk on Craftsy. Thank you for sharing so much about your inspiration, your life and journey, and your passions. I'm love your "rules of life" to embrace change, love to learn, and give freely. I've been following your blog sine about 2009 because I made one of the improv blocks and sent it in. I still haven't made my first quilt, but I'm about to start! Watching your talk kicked me in the pants to get stitching. Thank you!

Miss Sews-it-all said...

Congrats Jacquie - on being brave enought to follow your idea for this piece through to fruition, and on letting it go to let your ideas live on through others. And, I just noticed that the dripping blood makes and exclamation point towards the bottom of the quilt - as if to punctuate the message. You rock.

Byrd said...

This is going to go places for sure. I look forward to seeing what happens. Take care, Byrd

Poppyprint said...

Congratulations Jacquie.

Emily said...

Jacquie, your quilt slays me every time...thank you so much for making this work of art.

KerryQ said...

I think this quilt is very brave and honest and challenges us. It also keeps the victims of gun violence alive in our minds so that we don't forget .

Michelle said...

I wish you would offer this as a pattern.

juceyj03 said...

OMG IT MAKES ME TOTALLY SICK THAT SOMEONE WOULD EVEN BOTHER TO POST A COMMENT SAYING THAY DONT LIKE THIS QUILT! How rude! If you don't have something nice to say then don't say anything at all!
I love this quilt and all that it stands for!!
GREAT JOB!!
*Jessica
juceyj03@gmail.com